Skip to main content

Glorian serves millions of people, but receives donations from only about 300 people a year. Donate now.

  Sunday, 19 May 2024
  4 Replies
  462 Visits
I have studied your content about what happens after death. And I find these teachings very informative. I haven't heard these things spoken about in such detail anywhere else and so I'm grateful for that. With that said, I have several things that I would like clarification on:

1) In the lecture titled "After We Die" the speaker says that if we eliminate 100% percent of our ego and then enter death consciously we will be granted the opportunity to stay in the heavenly realm forever because by eliminating 100% of the ego, the soul would now be granted the quality of belonging there. But then later on in the lecture he says that, after death, souls don't ever stay in heaven or hell forever because God is a compassionate God and not an unjust God who would punish (and I guess reward) someone eternally for what they have done in one lifetime, or a series of lifetimes. So which one is it?

2) Also, the speaker said that even while we are in heaven (while dead or alive) we retain the capability to continue our work. But this seems to be a contradiction because if the soul is separated from the ego while in the heavenly realm (after death) then how could any further spiritual work be necessary or possible, and how could the soul ever fall back into a human incarnation once the ego is already absent? Can the soul ever reach a point where it has eliminated so much ego that it becomes incapable of going back into a human incarnation? And would that even be the most preferable outcome to strive for? What about the idea of descending back into the human world as a Bodhisattva?

3) According to the speaker, we are given 108 human lifetimes to disintegrate the ego. But then the speaker says that we can earn more or lose lifetimes, so then why does he say 108? Is that the default? Also, is there a limit to how many extra lives we can be granted?

4) If we disintegrate the ego and then have our vacation in the heavenly realm and then come back down to the human world, does that reset our time-frame back to 108 lifetimes? And is this the case even if we reincarnate as a Bodhisattva? Is there ever an end-goal to any of this? Is perpetual reincarnation as a Bodhisattva for eternity the most preferable outcome to strive towards?

5) The speaker says that he knows for a fact that he is on his last life, and he also later says that a lot of humanoids are now on their 108th lives and that most human beings on this planet will not come back into new bodies. Are all these things able to be seen by us if we awaken our consciousness enough?

6) If reincarnation as a Bodhisattva is possible, then wouldn't it imply predetermination to a significant degree? I don't see any other way besides predetermination by which it would be possible for the person who incarnates as a Bodhisattva to be guaranteed that he/she will fulfill that role without getting sidetracked.

7) In terms of preparation for death, the speaker talks about developing the practice of staying aware as we enter and remain asleep. And he say that if we are serious about it then we could try to do it for the full duration of sleep if we don't mind that we will lose some sleep and be more tired the next day. But isn't this only the case in the beginning and that as we get better at it, the opposite would be the case? In other words, wouldn't sleep eventually become more rejuvenating than before since we would no longer be wasting our energy playing out our conditioning as we sleep/dream?
1 month ago
·
#31117
Accepted Answer
1. Please provide a quote for this.

2. Experiences in higher dimensions do not change the condition of the psychological defects. Please remember that we are not an integral individual: we are a multiplicity. Our consciousness is fractured. Even if a portion of our consciousness is experiencing the heavenly worlds, the rest is still trapped in the lower dimensions.

3. 108 is both symbolic and literal, and is totally dependent upon cause and effect: karma. The actual number depends on the results of our actions.

4. No, it does not reset. The situation for bodhisattvas is totally different and too sophisticated to explain here.

5. Yes. However, anyone can know this simply by becoming cognizant of their dreams, and through experience in meditation.

6. Predetermination is a very tricky subject. Bringing "bodhisattvas" into it makes it even trickier. I recommend not thinking about this too much. Focus on your immediate situation, and do not let your mind wander too far into philosophical thorn bushes.

7. Yes.

“Nothing is easier than self-deceit. For what each man wishes, that he also believes.” —Demosthenes

"Do not worry; cultivate the habit of being happy." —Samael Aun Weor

1 month ago
·
#31117
Accepted Answer
1. Please provide a quote for this.

2. Experiences in higher dimensions do not change the condition of the psychological defects. Please remember that we are not an integral individual: we are a multiplicity. Our consciousness is fractured. Even if a portion of our consciousness is experiencing the heavenly worlds, the rest is still trapped in the lower dimensions.

3. 108 is both symbolic and literal, and is totally dependent upon cause and effect: karma. The actual number depends on the results of our actions.

4. No, it does not reset. The situation for bodhisattvas is totally different and too sophisticated to explain here.

5. Yes. However, anyone can know this simply by becoming cognizant of their dreams, and through experience in meditation.

6. Predetermination is a very tricky subject. Bringing "bodhisattvas" into it makes it even trickier. I recommend not thinking about this too much. Focus on your immediate situation, and do not let your mind wander too far into philosophical thorn bushes.

7. Yes.

“Nothing is easier than self-deceit. For what each man wishes, that he also believes.” —Demosthenes

"Do not worry; cultivate the habit of being happy." —Samael Aun Weor

Almustafa selected the reply #31117 as the answer for this post — 1 month ago
1 month ago
·
#31238
Thank you, Alexis. If it's possible, I would like to follow up on a few points:

1. Is it possible to eliminate our ego to the extent that we cease to reincarnate?

2. Is ceasing to reincarnate all together the most favorable outcome, or is it better to reincarnate as a bodhisattva?

3. You wrote that the process of how to reincarnate as a bodhisattva is too sophisticated to explain here. Could you point me to where I can learn more about that?

4. In the book "Beyond Death" Samael Aun Weor writes a lot about how if one is suffering in an unexplained way in this lifetime that it's typically a karmic consequence of something that was done in a previous life. For example:
8. My son has been sick for five years. We have spent a lot of money on doctors yet they have not found the exact cause of his sickness. Some say that perhaps it is because of a nervous shock, since he was quite an intelligent boy in his studies. Others suppose that he has been a victim of works of witchcraft. What is your opinion?

Samael Aun Weor: Obviously, by all means and under the light of a dazzling clarity, we see a punishment, a mental karma because of an erroneous use of the mind in previous lives.


I am currently undergoing a chronic illness that has my nervous system stuck in a fight-flight mode. Given everything that Samael Aun Weor says, would it be appropriate to assume that I deserve my illness based on my karma that extends back to past lifetimes?
1 month ago
·
#31242
1. Yes. This is the outcome of resurrection at the end of the second mountain. Before that, the existence of the ego requires the soul back to pay its debts.

2. That is the choice of your Innermost.

3. The books and courses touch on it, but the full story is only learned internally.

4. That is possible, but I would warn you against speculation or assumption. It is better to meditate on it in order to find the cause. This will likely require a lot of effort, payment of karmic debts, and patience.

“Nothing is easier than self-deceit. For what each man wishes, that he also believes.” —Demosthenes

"Do not worry; cultivate the habit of being happy." —Samael Aun Weor

1 month ago
·
#31244
Thank you very much. I will do my best to implement everything I learned. By the way, this organization is doing the work of a bodhisattva. I just donated $25. I hope others donate as well.
  • Page :
  • 1
There are no replies made for this post yet.